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A tribute to those lost at sea | By Isaiah Igish

The sun sets over the vast Pacific Ocean. Its magnificent view brings to life the warmth memories of families.
Deep scented saltwater breeze pounds heavily on your face like a final blow to your forehead by Carterets Islander and Papua New Guinea’s boxing sensation Thaddeus Katua’s ultimate whack to complete the bout.
Not knowing what tomorrow may bring, the 23-foot banana boat floats aimlessly following the direction of the current. Lost and weary at sea, all hopes of survival is hanging by a thread.
Five-men have been lost at sea for 28-days.
Team work, faith and perseverance had driven them to cling on to hope.
The men from Carterets were homebound to the Tulun (Carterets) Islands from Buka.
While Bougainville was celebrating the Autonomous Day on June 15th 2012, these men from Iagain took on a voyage they will always remember.
Sixty-one-year-old Anthon Lesley, a seasoned open sea skipper, was in charge of the boat.
Carterets Island sits 30 degrees North-East off Buka. The 57 nautical miles distance takes approximately three hours to reach aboard a 60-horse powered dingy.
Normally on a fine weather, after traveling for two hours, Buka Island will be hidden under the clouds and Carterets Island would sprout up the vast open sea like a drifting coconut. It would take another hour to reach the island and berth.
Lesly was operating a 60 horse Yamaha machine. Three hours into the trip, he realized he was off-course.
Without seeing land after traveling the hours required, the skipper knew an equipment or accessory on the boat wasn’t functioning well.
A very experienced skipper, Lesley used his 30-years’ experience as an open sea skipper to make a quick check on the equipment and stock.
The two major causes for drifting at sea – shortage of petrol or a faulty engine – were ruled out. There was enough petrol and no mechanical fault with the engine. The weather was fine.
With these two checked, he directed his attention to the compass he was using to navigate the open sea. He soon realised that the compass was tampered with.
The compass was salvage from a wrecked fishing vessel. He used the same compass on many occasions while navigating the open seas across the Bougainville Atoll islands.
“The water in the compass which helps the arrow give direction is actually alcohol. Vodka,” Lesley tells me while puffing his ‘brus-to-brus’ (tobacco).
“I think the night before our trip some drunks got the compass from the boat and emptied the alcohol content. They replaced it with home-brew (moonshine).
“It only needs a skilled professional to do such like a ship captain. The captain will know the volume needed to refill the compass to function 100%.
“The home-brew was the reason the compass didn’t function well.”
Lesley started his seasoned career as a skipper in the late 1980s.
He was the caretaker of the Iagain Island community boat for eight years on Carterets Island.
During the height of the Bougainville Crisis, Lesley was approached by the then North Solomon Provincial Health Division to be employed as the Sohano Hospital’s skipper. He also performed duties as a static guard.
The Provincial Hospital was formerly based on Sohano Island and later moved to Buka Island in 2000.
“During the crisis, there were lots of people who came to Sohano to receive treatments for wounds and other sickness,” Lesley recalled. (The PNG Government imposed a 10-year blockade on the island during the crisis. During this period, all supplies to Bougainville were cut off).
“The hospital kept patients records. Whenever someone passed away, the hospital would repatriate the bodies back to their homes.
“The bodies were repatriated because the morgue at Sohano wasn’t functioning well like the one in Arawa.”
Lesley’s task was to repatriate bodies to the West Coast of Bougainville (Torokina, Hahon, Kounua, Keriaka) by boat.
“It was tough times. Sometimes we were shot at by the Bougainville Revolutionary Army (BRA). They would think we were doing other business (recon operations for the Bougainville Resistance Force or the PNG Defence Force).
He retired from his work at the Provincial Health in early 2012.
After retirement, Lesley occasionally operated passenger boats servicing Buka and Carterets Island.
One of those trip ended with this ordeal at sea – drifting for a month.
Every person on Carterets Island will relate to the term ‘tirip’ (drift). At least three out of ten heads have drifted while either traveling to Buka from the island or otherwise.
Paul Kerehana, another Iagain Islander, sunk with nine others while traveling back to Carterets Island from Buka.
It was New Year’s Eve – 1st of January 2014. Their boat had a double engine – 60 and 40 horse giving it a total 100 horse power to carry its heavy load. On board were three kids under the age of 10 years and 6 adults.
The crew left Buka around 9am heading into a strong South-Easterly winds.
“We were already in the middle of Buka and Carterets when the weather turned from bad to worse,” Fifty-seven-year-old Kerehana recalled.
“There was no other way but to continue onwards. The wind was between 40-45 knots. The waves rose to 15-20 meters high.
“The boat was just a mere ant underneath these big waves.”
They made it into Carterets waters but before reaching Piul, one of other island that make up Carterets, the boat capsized under a big wave.
“We made it to Carterets. The final part of the journey was to cross the ‘sea buruk’ (surf break) and we were through to the reef and safety,” Kerehana said.
“The wind was so strong. We came under a very big wave which sunk the boat. The current was strong towards the open sea. I forced myself to swim to the reef.
“I was praying all along,” Kerehana, a devoted United Church christian said.
“After a few minutes of swimming against the high tide, my right foot felt a stone.
“I forced my toe into one of the cracks in the stone and never let go. I stood there till day break, singing and praising God for his guidance over me.”
Only three individuals survived the ordeal. The others perished.
The other two survivors are Patricia Topira and her now ex-husband Robin Tsube.
It was a sad day for the couple as they had to celebrate New Year without their two kids – four-year-old Raynad and one-year and seven-months old Cotilda.
Robin also lost his dad Paul Tsube and mother Rose during that ordeal.
The family spent Christmas in Buka and were returning to Carterets when disaster struck.
“The kids were sitting with their grandparents when the boat capsized,” Patricia, who is now an Early childhood teacher said.
“I was too weak and slept all along after too much vomiting. We capsized at about 3pm.
“The kids hang on to their grandmother because she had a life jacket on.
“While in the sea, Robin passed me an empty 20litre water container to help me swim. He swam behind me with an esky lid.
When the wind subdued two hours later, there was no sign of her kids or her parents-in-law.
For Patricia, never a day goes by that she never stopped thinking about her kids. The pain was unbearable for her that she decided to path-ways with Robin in 2015.
Today Patricia has Raynelda Andrea who is one-year and eight months old who consoles her broken heart every time she thinks about Raynad and Cotilda.
Many families from the Atolls will relate to the drifting experience. Many have lost loved ones at sea who have never returned.
Twenty-eight-year-old Jethro Toukena was on-board the boat skipped by Anthon Lesley.
He was fortunate to survive the ordeal and has a story to tell of his experience.
The same couldn’t be said for his dad Michael and elder brother Kevin.
Jethro’s dad and brother went missing when traveling from Buka to Carterets in 2015.
Till today, their remains have not been found including the other 12-people on board the boat.
Currently there is no passenger vessel servicing the Atolls.
This makes it riskier for boats traveling the open seas to Buka to get mostly food supplies.
Carterets has been hardly hit with effects of rising sea level.
The salt water has entered the island destroying food crops mainly swamp taro (kanokano), banana, sweet potato (kaukau) and cassava.
With no option of making gardens, the villagers heavily depend on rice as their ‘adopted’ staple food.
Boats need to frequently travel to Buka to get rice, flour, sugar and salt to ensure supply is maintained on the island. A one-way boat-fare is K150.
A boat owner would need one drum (200L) of petrol to make a return trip to Carterets from Buka. On the island, one-litre of petrol cost K10.
Hunger only strikes on the island when there are strong winds which stops the boats from traveling, because of the rough seas.
In these tough situation, the villagers resort to fish and coconut as their meals to see off a day.
However, boats still take the risk of traveling during strong winds.
In the 1990s North Solomon Provincial Government owned MV Sankamap used to make monthly trips to the Atolls – Carterets, Nissan, Nuguria (Fead), Mortlock, and Tasman.
Kerehana recalled that it was a good service and should be revived.
“We need a ship to service the Atolls like what (MV) Sankamap did,” he said.
“Many lives have been lost already.
“A ship traveling the Atolls will stop the boats from traveling to Buka and mitigate the risks on drifting at sea.”
Life on the island is more laidback – which only involves fishing. There is no space to make gardens.
The islanders depend on selling fresh fish and pislama (sea cucumber/beche-de-mer) as the only form of social income. Others have moved to Buka in the hope of building a better life.
The only way out for the inhabitants of the island is to find formal employment outside of Carterets to sustain their families back on the island.
Transportation remains yet a major challenge for the Carterets islanders.
Anthon Lesley and his crew were lucky because they had enough materials and supply on board to help them survive.
“During this trip, we were transporting mangroves sticks and ropes for a seaweed project on the island,” Lesley said while pointing to the location where the project once stood.
“The boat was loaded, even with food supplies.
“When I realized the compass was faulty, I killed the engine and told the boys ‘yumi tirip nau’ (We’re now drifting)”.
“We had a tank (25litres) remaining so I reserved it.”
The skipper said the boys gave up after the first three days of drifting.
“All hope was gone. We had food on-board but no one bothered to eat.
“Being a cheerful person, my tricks didn’t help.
“After the third day, they realized that we needed to keep fighting on for survival.”
When survival instincts kicked in, the idiom ‘where there’s a will, there’s a way’ came into effect.
Every cargo they had brought with them came in handy. It was like they had packed to get ‘lost’ at sea.
They used the mangroves sticks to build a shelter (Carterets is a coral island with no mangroves).
The taupalin they used was salvage from Peter Sharp’s MV Solomon Queen – before it got burnt down on Buka Passage in 2012. The taupalin was used as shelter and used to fetch water during the rain.
An aluminium bowl on board was used as a pot, tying it onto two sticks to be held on both ends over a fire. A shovel was used as the fireplace and mangroves as firewood. When cooking it was a balancing act waltzing with the waves for the two individuals as they keep the bowl of rice steady.
“We had one meal a day. It consisted of two spoons of rice and water. And that’s it,” Lesley said.
For a week there was no rain so they had to do without clean rain water.
Jethro Toukena came up with the idea of flavouring the salt water but it ended the same – salt water.
“We had no hope but to drink salt water,” Toukena said.
“I tried different mix with Tang, Sugar and Milk powder but it still tasted salty. You could only make two sips.
“We nearly died of dehydration.”
While drifting they were able to catch fish in an improvised manner. A nylon rope was used as a string and an Ox & Palm Bully Beef Key was used as a hook for deep sea fishing. Crazy but that’s survival instinct.
With his years of experience, Lesley avoided waves during thunderstorms by throwing the anchor down. The boat would turn to face the oncoming waves and remain afloat, swaying to the beat of the waves and wind.
Carterets fishermen are known sailors. They use sails mounted on canoes to go fishing, trawling or island-hopping. With that experience, the men built a sail from the materials on-board to navigate the bad weather.
During the month long tribulation at sea, they kept drifting between the waters of Bougainville and New Ireland.
“We drifted past Carterets, Nissan and Fead. We came near Anir in New Ireland but the strong currents pulled us back into Bougainville waters,” Lesley said.
If the current had not pulled them back into Bougainville, they would have drifted the open Pacific Ocean to the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM).
One afternoon on their fourth week at sea, a seagull landed on the boat’s sail to rest. The other bird flew past without stopping.
Lesley’s traditional fishing skills came into play.
“I recalled back to when we went out fishing,” he said.
“When a bird ate enough at sea, it will fly straight to land without stopping.
“I watched as this seagull flew right past us so I started sailing following the direction of the bird. When the bird disappeared I took mark on the cloud it was flying towards.
“When night fell, I picked a star in the same direction and sailed towards it. When the star came over our heads, I picked another star and that’s how we travelled all night.
“After hours of sailing, we decided to rest so the boys to threw the anchor.”
And just like that, they found land the next morning.
“When sunrise, one of the boys came out of the shelter to pee and saw land.
“He shouted ‘LAND!’”
“I was surprised! All around us was just reef!
“We came in through a passage and through to the reef. If we had hit the surf breaks (sea-buruk) it would have been a different story.
“I started the engine and used the last fuel to reach the island,” said Lesley.
They were on land and it was Bougainville soil. The men had anchored on one of the atoll islands on Fead (Nuguria).
From Fead, they made their way back to Carterets.
The same cannot be said for the others who never did. When the sun sets over the vast Pacific Ocean, families still pray that their loved ones are still out there in good spirit.
This is a tribute to loved ones lost at sea. May their soul Rest In Peace.Published in The National, Friday July 27, 2018.

TRIBUTE TO LIVES LOST AT SEA
The Carterets Islanders Tale

By ISAIAH MANISH IGISH

The sun sets over the vast Pacific Ocean. Its magnificent view brings to life the warmth memories of families.
Deep scented saltwater breeze pounds heavily on your face like a final blow to your forehead by Carterets Islander and Papua New Guinea’s boxing sensation Thaddeus Katua’s ultimate whack to complete the bout.
Not knowing what tomorrow may bring, the 23-foot banana boat floats aimlessly following the direction of the current. Lost and weary at sea, all hopes of survival is hanging by a thread.
Five-men have been lost at sea for 28-days.
Team work, faith and perseverance had driven them to cling on to hope.
The men from Carterets were homebound to the Tulun (Carterets) Islands from Buka.
While Bougainville was celebrating the Autonomous Day on June 15th 2012, these men from Iagain took on a voyage they will always remember.
Sixty-one-year-old Anthon Lesley, a seasoned open sea skipper, was in charge of the boat.
Carterets Island sits 30 degrees North-East off Buka. The 57 nautical miles distance takes approximately three hours to reach aboard a 60-horse powered dingy.
Normally on a fine weather, after traveling for two hours, Buka Island will be hidden under the clouds and Carterets Island would sprout up the vast open sea like a drifting coconut. It would take another hour to reach the island and berth.
Lesly was operating a 60 horse Yamaha machine. Three hours into the trip, he realized he was off-course.
Without seeing land after traveling the hours required, the skipper knew an equipment or accessory on the boat wasn’t functioning well.
A very experienced skipper, Lesley used his 30-years’ experience as an open sea skipper to make a quick check on the equipment and stock.
The two major causes for drifting at sea – shortage of petrol or a faulty engine – were ruled out. There was enough petrol and no mechanical fault with the engine. The weather was fine.
With these two checked, he directed his attention to the compass he was using to navigate the open sea. He soon realised that the compass was tampered with.
The compass was salvage from a wrecked fishing vessel. He used the same compass on many occasions while navigating the open seas across the Bougainville Atoll islands.
“The water in the compass which helps the arrow give direction is actually alcohol. Vodka,” Lesley tells me while puffing his ‘brus-to-brus’ (tobacco).
“I think the night before our trip some drunks got the compass from the boat and emptied the alcohol content. They replaced it with home-brew (moonshine).
“It only needs a skilled professional to do such like a ship captain. The captain will know the volume needed to refill the compass to function 100%.
“The home-brew was the reason the compass didn’t function well.”
Lesley started his seasoned career as a skipper in the late 1980s.
He was the caretaker of the Iagain Island community boat for eight years on Carterets Island.
During the height of the Bougainville Crisis, Lesley was approached by the then North Solomon Provincial Health Division to be employed as the Sohano Hospital’s skipper. He also performed duties as a static guard.
The Provincial Hospital was formerly based on Sohano Island and later moved to Buka Island in 2000.
“During the crisis, there were lots of people who came to Sohano to receive treatments for wounds and other sickness,” Lesley recalled. (The PNG Government imposed a 10-year blockade on the island during the crisis. During this period, all supplies to Bougainville were cut off).
“The hospital kept patients records. Whenever someone passed away, the hospital would repatriate the bodies back to their homes.
“The bodies were repatriated because the morgue at Sohano wasn’t functioning well like the one in Arawa.”
Lesley’s task was to repatriate bodies to the West Coast of Bougainville (Torokina, Hahon, Kounua, Keriaka) by boat.
“It was tough times. Sometimes we were shot at by the Bougainville Revolutionary Army (BRA). They would think we were doing other business (recon operations for the Bougainville Resistance Force or the PNG Defence Force).
He retired from his work at the Provincial Health in early 2012.
After retirement, Lesley occasionally operated passenger boats servicing Buka and Carterets Island.
One of those trip ended with this ordeal at sea – drifting for a month.
Every person on Carterets Island will relate to the term ‘tirip’ (drift). At least three out of ten heads have drifted while either traveling to Buka from the island or otherwise.
Paul Kerehana, another Iagain Islander, sunk with nine others while traveling back to Carterets Island from Buka.
It was New Year’s Eve – 1st of January 2014. Their boat had a double engine – 60 and 40 horse giving it a total 100 horse power to carry its heavy load. On board were three kids under the age of 10 years and 6 adults.
The crew left Buka around 9am heading into a strong South-Easterly winds.
“We were already in the middle of Buka and Carterets when the weather turned from bad to worse,” Fifty-seven-year-old Kerehana recalled.
“There was no other way but to continue onwards. The wind was between 40-45 knots. The waves rose to 15-20 meters high.
“The boat was just a mere ant underneath these big waves.”
They made it into Carterets waters but before reaching Piul, one of other island that make up Carterets, the boat capsized under a big wave.
“We made it to Carterets. The final part of the journey was to cross the ‘sea buruk’ (surf break) and we were through to the reef and safety,” Kerehana said.
“The wind was so strong. We came under a very big wave which sunk the boat. The current was strong towards the open sea. I forced myself to swim to the reef.
“I was praying all along,” Kerehana, a devoted United Church christian said.
“After a few minutes of swimming against the high tide, my right foot felt a stone.
“I forced my toe into one of the cracks in the stone and never let go. I stood there till day break, singing and praising God for his guidance over me.”
Only three individuals survived the ordeal. The others perished.
The other two survivors are Patricia Topira and her now ex-husband Robin Tsube.
It was a sad day for the couple as they had to celebrate New Year without their two kids – four-year-old Raynad and one-year and seven-months old Cotilda.
Robin also lost his dad Paul Tsube and mother Rose during that ordeal.
The family spent Christmas in Buka and were returning to Carterets when disaster struck.
“The kids were sitting with their grandparents when the boat capsized,” Patricia, who is now an Early childhood teacher said.
“I was too weak and slept all along after too much vomiting. We capsized at about 3pm.
“The kids hang on to their grandmother because she had a life jacket on.
“While in the sea, Robin passed me an empty 20litre water container to help me swim. He swam behind me with an esky lid.
When the wind subdued two hours later, there was no sign of her kids or her parents-in-law.
For Patricia, never a day goes by that she never stopped thinking about her kids. The pain was unbearable for her that she decided to path-ways with Robin in 2015.
Today Patricia has Raynelda Andrea who is one-year and eight months old who consoles her broken heart every time she thinks about Raynad and Cotilda.
Many families from the Atolls will relate to the drifting experience. Many have lost loved ones at sea who have never returned.
Twenty-eight-year-old Jethro Toukena was on-board the boat skipped by Anthon Lesley.
He was fortunate to survive the ordeal and has a story to tell of his experience.
The same couldn’t be said for his dad Michael and elder brother Kevin.
Jethro’s dad and brother went missing when traveling from Buka to Carterets in 2015.
Till today, their remains have not been found including the other 12-people on board the boat.
Currently there is no passenger vessel servicing the Atolls.
This makes it riskier for boats traveling the open seas to Buka to get mostly food supplies.
Carterets has been hardly hit with effects of rising sea level.
The salt water has entered the island destroying food crops mainly swamp taro (kanokano), banana, sweet potato (kaukau) and cassava.
With no option of making gardens, the villagers heavily depend on rice as their ‘adopted’ staple food.
Boats need to frequently travel to Buka to get rice, flour, sugar and salt to ensure supply is maintained on the island. A one-way boat-fare is K150.
A boat owner would need one drum (200L) of petrol to make a return trip to Carterets from Buka. On the island, one-litre of petrol cost K10.
Hunger only strikes on the island when there are strong winds which stops the boats from traveling, because of the rough seas.
In these tough situation, the villagers resort to fish and coconut as their meals to see off a day.
However, boats still take the risk of traveling during strong winds.
In the 1990s North Solomon Provincial Government owned MV Sankamap used to make monthly trips to the Atolls – Carterets, Nissan, Nuguria (Fead), Mortlock, and Tasman.
Kerehana recalled that it was a good service and should be revived.
“We need a ship to service the Atolls like what (MV) Sankamap did,” he said.
“Many lives have been lost already.
“A ship traveling the Atolls will stop the boats from traveling to Buka and mitigate the risks on drifting at sea.”
Life on the island is more laidback – which only involves fishing. There is no space to make gardens.
The islanders depend on selling fresh fish and pislama (sea cucumber/beche-de-mer) as the only form of social income. Others have moved to Buka in the hope of building a better life.
The only way out for the inhabitants of the island is to find formal employment outside of Carterets to sustain their families back on the island.
Transportation remains yet a major challenge for the Carterets islanders.
Anthon Lesley and his crew were lucky because they had enough materials and supply on board to help them survive.
“During this trip, we were transporting mangroves sticks and ropes for a seaweed project on the island,” Lesley said while pointing to the location where the project once stood.
“The boat was loaded, even with food supplies.
“When I realized the compass was faulty, I killed the engine and told the boys ‘yumi tirip nau’ (We’re now drifting)”.
“We had a tank (25litres) remaining so I reserved it.”
The skipper said the boys gave up after the first three days of drifting.
“All hope was gone. We had food on-board but no one bothered to eat.
“Being a cheerful person, my tricks didn’t help.
“After the third day, they realized that we needed to keep fighting on for survival.”
When survival instincts kicked in, the idiom ‘where there’s a will, there’s a way’ came into effect.
Every cargo they had brought with them came in handy. It was like they had packed to get ‘lost’ at sea.
They used the mangroves sticks to build a shelter (Carterets is a coral island with no mangroves).
The taupalin they used was salvage from Peter Sharp’s MV Solomon Queen – before it got burnt down on Buka Passage in 2012. The taupalin was used as shelter and used to fetch water during the rain.
An aluminium bowl on board was used as a pot, tying it onto two sticks to be held on both ends over a fire. A shovel was used as the fireplace and mangroves as firewood. When cooking it was a balancing act waltzing with the waves for the two individuals as they keep the bowl of rice steady.
“We had one meal a day. It consisted of two spoons of rice and water. And that’s it,” Lesley said.
For a week there was no rain so they had to do without clean rain water.
Jethro Toukena came up with the idea of flavouring the salt water but it ended the same – salt water.
“We had no hope but to drink salt water,” Toukena said.
“I tried different mix with Tang, Sugar and Milk powder but it still tasted salty. You could only make two sips.
“We nearly died of dehydration.”
While drifting they were able to catch fish in an improvised manner. A nylon rope was used as a string and an Ox & Palm Bully Beef Key was used as a hook for deep sea fishing. Crazy but that’s survival instinct.
With his years of experience, Lesley avoided waves during thunderstorms by throwing the anchor down. The boat would turn to face the oncoming waves and remain afloat, swaying to the beat of the waves and wind.
Carterets fishermen are known sailors. They use sails mounted on canoes to go fishing, trawling or island-hopping. With that experience, the men built a sail from the materials on-board to navigate the bad weather.
During the month long tribulation at sea, they kept drifting between the waters of Bougainville and New Ireland.
“We drifted past Carterets, Nissan and Fead. We came near Anir in New Ireland but the strong currents pulled us back into Bougainville waters,” Lesley said.
If the current had not pulled them back into Bougainville, they would have drifted the open Pacific Ocean to the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM).
One afternoon on their fourth week at sea, a seagull landed on the boat’s sail to rest. The other bird flew past without stopping.
Lesley’s traditional fishing skills came into play.
“I recalled back to when we went out fishing,” he said.
“When a bird ate enough at sea, it will fly straight to land without stopping.
“I watched as this seagull flew right past us so I started sailing following the direction of the bird. When the bird disappeared I took mark on the cloud it was flying towards.
“When night fell, I picked a star in the same direction and sailed towards it. When the star came over our heads, I picked another star and that’s how we travelled all night.
“After hours of sailing, we decided to rest so the boys to threw the anchor.”
And just like that, they found land the next morning.
“When sunrise, one of the boys came out of the shelter to pee and saw land.
“He shouted ‘LAND!’”
“I was surprised! All around us was just reef!
“We came in through a passage and through to the reef. If we had hit the surf breaks (sea-buruk) it would have been a different story.
“I started the engine and used the last fuel to reach the island,” said Lesley.
They were on land and it was Bougainville soil. The men had anchored on one of the atoll islands on Fead (Nuguria).
From Fead, they made their way back to Carterets.
The same cannot be said for the others who never did. When the sun sets over the vast Pacific Ocean, families still pray that their loved ones are still out there in good spirit.
This is a tribute to loved ones lost at sea. May their soul Rest In Peace.

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